State Historical Society acquires 1930s lantern slide collection

Pictured is the Chicago and Northwestern Railroad Depot in Redfield, one of 90 lantern slide images from the Rev. H. J. Loemker Collection recently donated to the South Dakota State Historical Society. (Photo courtesy South Dakota State Historical Society-Archives)

PIERRE, S.D. – The South Dakota State Historical Society recently acquired a collection of glass lantern slides dating back to the 1930s.

The Rev. H. J. Loemker (LOME-ker) Collection consists of 90 lantern slides, which were introduced in 1849 and allowed photographs to be projected onto a surface and viewed by a larger audience. Lantern slides were popular until the 1950s, when smaller 2×2 transparencies were introduced.

Loemker was a Methodist minister who served churches in Iowa and Illinois before eventually coming to South Dakota and ministering in the Crandon area of Spink County.

A majority of the Loemker images are from Spink County sites, but the collection also includes images from various locations throughout South Dakota. The collection includes images taken in or near the towns of Crandon, Redfield, Parker, Ashton, Woonsocket, Turton, Brookings, Clifton, Hermosa, Rapid City, Custer, Pierre, Hitchcock, Tulare and Webster.

Slide topics include churches and parsonages, agricultural scenes and machinery, tourist destinations, town scenes, automobiles, winter scenes, sod houses and courthouses.

The donor purchased the lantern slides at an auction and later donated them to the State Historical Society-Archives, located at the Cultural Heritage Center in Pierre.

“The Loemker Collection offers a broad range of South Dakota images from the 1930s,” said Chelle Somsen, State Archivist. “Collections like these are what add depth and breadth to our state’s history.”

Select images from the Loemker Collection are on the State Archive’s Facebook page via http://history.sd.gov/Archives.

To donate items relating to the history of South Dakota, contact Matthew Reitzel, manuscript archivist, at (605) 773-3615 or Dan Brosz, curator of collections, at (605) 773-6013.

The State Historical Society-Archives is open Monday through Friday and the first Saturday of each month from 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. CDT. Contact the archives by phone at (605) 773-3804 or email archref@state.sd.us.

— From a State Historical Society news release

The Thrill of the Hunt: A Guide to Pheasant Hunting in South Dakota

The Thrill of the Hunt: A Guide to Pheasant Hunting in South Dakota

South Dakota's Pheasant Hunting Culture In South Dakota, pheasant hunting transcends the typical sporting activity; it's woven into the very fabric of the state's identity. The tradition of pheasant hunting is deeply cherished, with the opening weekend often likened...

Discovering the Hidden Gems: Best Places to Visit in South Dakota

Discovering the Hidden Gems: Best Places to Visit in South Dakota

Unveiling South Dakota's Splendor: Must-See Natural Wonders The Majestic Mount Rushmore: America's Shrine of Democracy Nestled in the Black Hills of South Dakota, Mount Rushmore National Memorial stands as a monumental tribute to four of the United States' most...

Great Faces. Great Places.

South Dakota is an incredibly unique state in that each region offers a completely different experience then the others. Check out each of the regions to see what each has to offer!

Badlands

Western South Dakota

Featuring the Black Hills, Badlands, the Sturgis Rally. This region tends to be the most popular.

CENTRAL REGION

This region of South Dakota offers some of the best hunting and fishing in the entire central US. 

Eastern Region

The eastern region is home to the largest city in the state and provides visitors with a true "prairie" experience.